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Field Notes: On Happy Campers

  • July 23, 2015

     

    Uintahs_05

    Field Notes: Drive an Hour, Feel the Power

    We’ve discussed the magic of the mountains on more than one occasion, no doubt. Our good city is Uintas-adjacent, which is just about the best possible selling point we can think of for those seeking a life with a touch of solitude. If you’re looking to get grounded, we’ve got grounds for that, so we’ll continue to remind you however we can that nature–like, the good shit–is right outside your door, and it would serve you well to take full advantage at every turn. Two of our favorite clients and COLLECTIVE photographers, Jess & Nata, decided to make a day of a quick trip on the Highline Trail to the Naturalist Basin. And they photographed it. Aaaand it’s beautiful. So we snatched up the opportunity to get on the soapbox and wax all poetic. The internet isn’t sure who said the following quote, but we stand behind the sentiment with our whole, COLLECTIVE hearts: “The human spirit needs places where nature has not been rearranged by the hand of man.” We have a feeling that you all agree, but on the off chance that you’ve not been appreciating our natural surroundings for all they’re worth, now’s the time. Find a vehicle, make the drive, and feel the joy. And if’n you’re not sure how, keep reading. We’ve got a few small tips to help:

    1. Phone home. No, seriously. Leave your phone at home. Now’s a good time to check out of social media land and prepare to be entertained by something you can’t hold in your hand. It’s 24 hours, for hell’s sake. Netflix will be waiting when you get home.

    2. Pack light, snack right. And vice versa. If you decide to camp for the night, plan ahead: car camping is supes easy, and you can bring whatever you like. But if you’re “hiking in” to a spot, we’d advise a touch of willpower. Avoid the heavy stuff. A mile hike to pitch your tent in the perfect meadow will make the Yeti full of beer feel like the corpse of this dead horse we’re beating.

    3. Get lost. Go on! Just go! Get outta here! Really, though…a hike is most advisable. Don’t actually get lost or anything (a simple compass or map will help), but you should take the opportunity to explore. We’re talking hundreds of thousands of acres here. Plus thousands of lakes. And hundres of miles of streams. You oughta look around, pal.

    4. Don’t bug out. We’re told that the two lookers you see below took a major beating in the way of mosquito attacks (see: Nata, inside the tent). Do we prefer the natural, organic repellents? Yes. But that deep-woods shit might just be the only thing that’ll do in the event that the blood suckers are out in masses. Be prepared, man.

    5. See the light. Just, like…look around. Lay down in your meadow and watch some clouds pass. Take deep breaths and marvel at the badass broad that is Mother Nature. For some of us, this is church: praise and worship are the order of the day, and prayer means actually getting your hands dirty. Feel that? Amen.

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